Is it cold where you are? Keep working safely when cold weather comes With winter on the way, you and your co-workers need to take extra steps to stay safe when working and commuting in cold weather.

#BizTip

Is it cold where you are? Keep working safely when cold weather comes With winter on the way, you and your co-workers need to take extra steps to stay safe when working and commuting in cold weather.

Think warm thoughts and follow these guidelines:

  • Dress in layers. You want to dress warmly enough for all conditions. Layers allow you to remove excess clothing if you begin to sweat, or add clothes if temperatures drop.
  • Stay covered. Make sure your skin and face are fully covered in subzero temperatures to avoid frostbite. Wear goggles to protect your eyes.
  • Invest in long underwear. If you’ll be outside for any extended period of time, get long underwear that will pull sweat and moisture away from your skin.
  • Wear mittens. Your hands will stay warmer if your fingers aren’t separated. If you have to switch from mittens to gloves for certain tasks, do it quickly. Fingers are very susceptible to frostbite because they’re far from your body’s center.
  • Take frequent breaks. Don’t stay out in the cold too long or overexert yourself. Get inside to warmer, dry conditions. Eat hot foods and drink hot, sweet beverages to warm up, but avoid caffeine.

Make the most of your Pharmacy Marketing Quarterly experience. Join us onFacebook, follow us on Twitter and Instagram and of course read our current and past issues on our website! And stay tuned this January for the release of our sister publication Compounding Matters Quarterly! This new magazine is the official publication of the International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists. Learn more on our Facebook page and Twitter feed!

PRESS RELEASE

WASHINGTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–A broad cross-section of organizations representing varied health care providers and the pharmacy community has sent a letter to U.S. Senate and House leaders expressing serious concerns with the federal government’s implementation of the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA)enacted in November 2013, and is calling on Congress to fix the law.

The Food and Drug Administration’s current interpretation of the DQSA essentially eliminates all repackaging of medications and creates barriers to office-use by requiring a prescription in advance of a compounded medication’s preparation. This runs counter to the intent of office-use, which is the method by which physicians and other prescribers obtain medications from pharmacists to administer and treat patients.

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The office holiday party can be lots of fun, but it’s never an excuse to get crazy. No matter what the occasion, remember that you’re still attending a business function.

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Happy holidays!  Here are some gift giving tips for gifts that your employees will truly value with these gift giving tips!

As the December holidays approach, you may be thinking about giving gifts to your employees to show your appreciation of their efforts throughout the year. Not a bad idea, but approach it with some caution.
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Here's a #BizTip from Pharmacy Marketing Quarterly - Get Organized!

Get organized and get more done at work Staying organized is a big challenge for some of us. When you can’t manage time, data, or your workspace effectively, you won’t be able to do your job to the best of your ability. Follow this advice for taking control of your day, every day:

  • Prioritize your tasks. Don’t start in on the latest email in your inbox or whatever’s on top of your desk when you arrive at work. Spend a few minutes determining your most important tasks for the day those jobs that contribute directly to your organization’s goals. Focus on those and you’ll be more productive.
  • Communicate with others. Keep in close touch with your manager and your co-workers. If you know what they’re up to, and what their priorities are, you can plan your tasks around them and cut down on wasted or duplicated effort.
  • Manage your information. Take the time to sort and organize the information you’re responsible for. Delete nonessential documents and emails, and file important data so that you can locate it quickly on your computer or in your workspace when you (or a co-worker) need it.
  • Control your schedule. A to-do list should be more than a random collection of tasks. Decide how much time to spend on each item, and the best time of day to work on it. Stick to your priorities, but be ready to adjust your schedule according to circumstances. Don’t follow it slavishly if opportunities or emergencies arise.